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High Driving A hot Topic for Colorado Law Enforcement

Todd Davis - Tuesday, September 27, 2011

As the legalization and use of medical marijuana in Colorado grows to new heights, Colorado law enforcers are finding themselves busier than ever with traffic violations related to marijuana usage. While all states currently have a law against driving while impaired, there are some lawmakers in the state of Colorado who are proposing to set an impairment standard which would allow prosecutors to charge drivers with a DUI if they have 5 nanograms of THC per milliliter of blood while behind the wheel.  Currently, Nevada and Ohio have a limit of 2 nanograms of THC per milliliter for driving and 12 other states have a zero-tolerance policy for driving while under the influence of any illegal substance. Arizona, Illinois and Rhode Island are just a few of these states with a zero-tolerance policy. Colorado has yet to set a limit for driving while under the influence of THC, but until a law is passed, those driving while under the influence of marijuana beyond the state-allowed limit for impairment will be prosecuted.

Colorado Medical Marijuana Patient Information to Remain Confidential

Todd Davis - Monday, May 23, 2011

 

 

Many users of medical marijuana in Colorado have had a growing concern regarding their personal information becoming public through state-maintained databases. This concern grew with the passing of legislation in 2010 assigning regulatory authority of medical marijuana centers, Infused Product Manufacturers and growers to the Colorado Department of Revenue. This legislation required the Colorado Department of Public Health to share limited, non personally identifying information to the DOR in order to verify the number of patients a marijuana center is serving as a provider. There is currently no such database which allows the two agencies to share information. Should this database be created, it will be intended for law officials to have access to verify whether individuals have a valid ID card. However, they can only access the system using information provided by the patient directly and no names or personal information will be shared.

Newe Laws May Inhibit Colorado Medical Marijuana Caregivers

Todd Davis - Saturday, May 07, 2011

 

 

Colorado medical marijuana caregivers may be under tighter scrutiny in the near future as state legislators work to pass bills requiring caregivers to be more open about the product they grow. Lawmakers in Colorado are concerned that it may be harder to disseminate between legitimate caregivers and what they consider to be basement drug dealers. A bill currently pending in legislature is aimed at creating a database of the estimated 40,000 registered caregivers in the state who currently are not under the same kind of security or reporting requirements as commercial dealers. Caregivers are concerned this may put them at risk for police harassment as well as increased crime.

Mr Suthers, Fire Your Researchers; They are Harming your Reputation

Todd Davis - Thursday, January 14, 2010

After reading Mr Suthers Huffington blog post, it is our opinion that Mr Suthers has been greatly misinformed as to the state of the medical marijuana community in Colorado. Mr Suthers please, put patients before politics, and certainly put patients before paranoia.

 

Our company (CMM) Colorado Medical Marijuana LLC (not a dispensary) has assisted thousands of patients with the application and registration process for the Colorado Medical Marijuana Registry. Has anyone asked a company like ours what the patients needs are and what the majority of Colorado’s medical marijuana patients seek in new legislation. Senator Romer understands the importance of sifting through myth and finding some truth. His suggestion to get the patients to participate in the medical marijuana debate is crucial.

 

When the founders of (CMM) were interested in becoming medical marijuana patients they had to call over 50 doctors in Colorado before they could find one doctor that was wiling to recommend marijuana as medicine. This is the reason (CMM) was created. This is also the reason that only 5 doctors are responsible for 80% of the medical marijuana recommendation s in the state. There are thousands of patients in Colorado seeking relief and finding the same dead ends.

 

Fortunately there are good doctors (checking and reviewing records) that understand the need to incorporate a variety of weapons into the pain management arsenal. Our partner doctors will not recommend marijuana to patients that do not have a qualifying condition but they rarely have to deny a patient. The reason is fairly simple; we prescreen clients and request records. This simple procedure is all that is needed to safeguard good patient’s rights to use medical marijuana. Mr Suthers, please contact us and let us show you the evidence that good doctors and ethical business owners exist within the emerging medical marijuana community.

 

Some politicians have suggested that they redefine the doctor patient relationship and what constitutes a bonafide relationship. They have suggested that patients should be wheeled down or limp into the nearest doctor’s office multiple times to receive a card. This is very painful and costly for most qualified patients. Qualified patients have turned to medical marijuana as a last resort in treating their debilitating and chronic medical conditions in hopes of living a normal life. No, the answer is not to require these poor and debilitated patients to spend extra days and money they do not have, in and out of the doctor’s office.

 

Qualified patients have enough problems in life and the process to get a medical marijuana recommendation and card is already difficult and expensive. On Monday our office received a call from recent cancer widow. She told us that her husband applied for a card, paid to get a physicians recommendation to use medical marijuana, had his application notarized and paid a fee of $90 to Colorado Medical Marijuana Registry (CDPHE).  He died before his ID card came and he never even knew that the doctor’s signature was all that was needed to use marijuana legally. He was trying to be a good and law abiding citizen waiting for his medical marijuana card to come in the mail (Currently delayed 14 to 16 weeks).

 

Mr Suthers, doctors do not prescribe medical marijuana, a drug that is safer than cough syrup. Doctors may only recommend marijuana. Mr. Suthers consider your quote “Can you imagine any other drug or treatment where a doctor is directly incentivized to prescribe a specific treatment method? The public would be outraged if a drug company were effectively paying a doctor in cash to prescribe their product”. No Mr Suthers, we do not have to imaging because we see it every day with the nation’s pharmaceutical companies and our states practicing physicians. They might not exchange cash directly but exchanges are being made.. Patients are sick and tired of the Reefer Madness and tired and sick from the deadly synthetic chemicals they are prescribed with out any fanfare or responsibility. Mr Suthers, please call us and get some of the facts that you will need in these upcoming weeks. Multiple doctor visits with needless poking and prodding is not the answer, good records straight from one MD or DO to another MD or DO are the answer.

 

 

(CMM) Management

Medical Marijuana in Colorado Still a Subject of Controversy

Todd Davis - Saturday, August 08, 2009

Although a voter-approved amendment to the state constitution has deemed medical marijuana in Colorado legal, conflicts still arise. The City of Ft. Collins refused to pay a couple’s claim for over $200,000 after plants that were seized in a raid were left to rot and die.

The confiscated plants were returned to the couple over a year later when a judge ruled that the couple qualified as Colorado medical marijuana growers. The claim was later filed by the couple who stated the plants were dry, dead and moldy, but the Police claim they were not required to keep them alive because the couple did not have the proper permits. According to the couple’s attorney a civil suit will probably be filed in state court in an attempt to force the city to pay for the damages.


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